Adopt a Dane Puppy or Rescue

When first thinking about adding a pet to the family, the first decision to consider is whether to buy a puppy or adopt an older dog or rescue. There are advantages to each.

Adopt a Great Dane Puppy or a Great Dane Rescue?

When first thinking about adding a pet to the family, the first decision to consider is whether to buy a puppy or adopt an older dog or rescue. There are advantages to each.

If you are thinking about either an older dog or puppy, you are more likely to get a healthy, well adjusted puppy or perhaps older dog from a reputable breeder. It would be best not to support pet stores by purchasing puppies from them. Often times puppies sold at pet stores are bred just for profit and don’t come from carefully selected breeding stock.

Adding a Shelter Dog or Older dog to your family

It isn’t true that all older dogs are surrendered to shelters because of behavioral issues. Oftentimes pets are returned to breeders or given to rescues/shelters because of a change in family situation, loss of job, death in the family, divorce. So researching rescues and breeders to adopt an older dog can oftentimes lead to the perfect fit for a new family member. Below I will outline some benefits and challenges to adopting an older dog.

Advantages:

  • Most older dogs will be house trained and have some obedience training.
  • Older dogs will be current on shots, already be neutered/spayed and in the case of Great Danes, they may already have had the surgery to help prevent death from bloat, one of the most common ways Great Danes die.
  • If you get your older dog from a reputable breeder or rescue they will support you for the life of the dog and if things don’t work out, will take the dog back.
  • Older dogs will be more settled and generally have less energy than a puppy. This can be a big factor for families that want a dog that doesn’t require a lot of energy.
  • Adult dogs have well established personalities so it is easier to make good matches between dogs and their new families. For instance high energy dogs can be matched with very active families who are always on the go and love doing things with their dogs. Lower energy dogs are better for dogs whose new families are looking for a lower energy dog.
  • Generally older dogs will cost less than a puppy from a reputable breeder.

The Challenges:

  • Some older dogs may have behavioral issues and need to be retrained.
  • Some older dogs may suffer from separation anxiety. They may take a while to adapt to their new living situation.
  • You may not know exactly what breed the dog you pick is mixed with, although there are many purebred dogs in shelters.
  • The cost of adopting from a shelter is much lower than the cost of purchasing a puppy from a breeder.

Purchasing a puppy from a reputable breeder

If you decide to buy a puppy from a breeder, research breeders carefully and choose a reputable breeder. A Great Dane puppy will be a LARGE part of your family for 8-12 years, you want to carefully choose a breeder that will sell you a healthy puppy that will be a good match for your family.

Advantages:

  • You well get to know the puppies breeder quite well. If you buy from a reputable breeder you will be part of an extended family and support work for the life of your dog.
  • You will likely meet the mother (dam) of the puppies and at least see pictures of the father.
  • Reputable breeders will provide genetic health testing to make sure your dog is not likely to carry any inherited genetic problems.
  • You will have the opportunity to mold your puppy into the perfect pet—as long as you are patient and consistent with positive training.
  • You know exactly what you are getting in terms of breed—make sure you find the right breed for your family.

Challenges:

  • Puppies are a great deal of work. I personally purchase puppies in late spring or summer because you end up spending A LOT of time outside with your puppy, especially if you pick them up when they are only 8 weeks old.
  • You must spend a great deal of time training your puppy. Danes especially must go through obedience training. They are big animals and one of the reasons people return their danes or turn them over to rescue is the dogs got too large without proper training and people couldn’t control them. Because of their size, Danes need to have good manners.
  • Most Great Danes chew, a lot. Great Dane puppies chew on kitchen cabinets (ask me for pictures), woodwork (ask me for pictures), walls, bedding and furniture.

If you are thinking about either an older dog or puppy, you are more likely to get a healthy, well adjusted puppy or perhaps older dog from a reputable breeder. It would be best not to support pet stores by purchasing puppies from them. Often times puppies sold at pet stores are bred just for profit and don’t come from carefully selected breeding stock.

Adding a Shelter Dog or Older dog to your family

It isn’t true that all older dogs are surrendered to shelters because of behavioral issues. Oftentimes pets are returned to breeders or given to rescues/shelters because of a change in family situation, loss of job, death in the family, divorce. So researching rescues and breeders to adopt an older dog can oftentimes lead to the perfect fit for a new family member. Below I will outline some benefits and challenges to adopting an older dog.

Advantages:

  • Most older dogs will be house trained and have some obedience training.
  • Older dogs will be current on shots, already be neutered/spayed and in the case of Great Danes, they may already have had the surgery to help prevent death from bloat, one of the most common ways Great Danes die.
  • If you get your older dog from a reputable breeder or rescue they will support you for the life of the dog and if things don’t work out, will take the dog back.
  • Older dogs will be more settled and generally have less energy than a puppy. This can be a big factor for families that want a dog that doesn’t require a lot of energy.
  • Adult dogs have well established personalities so it is easier to make good matches between dogs and their new families. For instance high energy dogs can be matched with very active families who are always on the go and love doing things with their dogs. Lower energy dogs are better for dogs whose new families are looking for a lower energy dog.
  • Generally older dogs will cost less than a puppy from a reputable breeder.

The Challenges:

  • Some older dogs may have behavioral issues and need to be retrained.
  • Some older dogs may suffer from separation anxiety. They may take a while to adapt to their new living situation.
  • You may not know exactly what breed the dog you pick is mixed with, although there are many purebred dogs in shelters.
  • The cost of adopting from a shelter is much lower than the cost of purchasing a puppy from a breeder.